Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Information Needs of Children - "Beginning Readers"

First off, a bit of an introduction: What some libraries refer to as "Easy Readers", our library system refers to as "Beginning Readers". These books are aimed at approximately K-2 grades when a child is first learning to read on their own. They contain anywhere from one word on a page, to the very easiest of "chapter books". And now...onto the books!

Spring Surprises by Anna Hays

Spring Surprises is a beginning reader that describes the transition from winter to spring: the animals come out of hibernation, the snow melts, new flowers begin to bloom, and a family is finally able to enjoy typical outside spring activities again. 

The book engages new readers with a majority of illustrations, short, rhyming sentences, in a large font size. It also succeeds in presenting "first facts" about the passage between two seasons.

This book is appropriate for ages 4-6.



Ducks Go Vroom by Jane Kohuth

Ducks Go Vroom is intended for very early readers. It is mostly 2-4 word sentences that describe the actions and noises of a duck family as they go visit a family of geese. 

The book engages new readers with a majority of illustrations, and short, rhyming sentences in a large font size.

This book is appropriate for ages 3-5.




I Do Not Like Greens! by Paul Orshoski

I Do Not Like Greens! is a story about a typical child who does not like, nor want to eat her vegetables. She would rather have meat and sweets, but once her dog eats piles of meat and sweets and she sees her dog get sick, she realizes vegetables aren’t that bad after all. 

This book works to engage new readers like most beginning readers do – the text rhymes and is arranged in short sentences with a larger font size. Also, most children can relate to not wanting to eat vegetables or foods that seem “strange” to them, and will enjoy reading about a child their age. This book begins and ends with games you can play before, while, or after you read, and what kid doesn't like games?!

This book is appropriate for ages 4-6.



Robot Man by Paul Orshoski

Robot Man is a story of a boy and his dad who are tired of doing chores, so they order a build-your-own-robot to assemble and then do the chores for them. Everything is fine at first, but eventually something on Robot Man breaks and he starts doing everything wrong. The result? Mom makes them send back the robot and do the work themselves. 

This book is published by the same company as I Do Not Like Greens! and shares the same qualities to engage new readers: rhyming text in short sentences with a larger font size, about a child their age, and also begins and ends with games you can play.

This book is appropriate for ages 4-6.



Mac and Cheese by Sarah Weeks


Mac and Cheese is essentially a re-telling of The Odd Couple, but using cats instead of people. Mac and Cheese are best friends, but Cheese doesn’t like to do anything that Mac does. In the end, though, when Mac is in trouble, Cheese does everything he hates to do in order to help Mac. 

This book also has short sentences with rhyming text in a larger print. It is about cats (and we know that children typically enjoy reading about animals), and teaches children valuable lessons such as: it is okay to have friends who are different than you; and you should do things your friends like, even if they’re not your favorite things to do.

This book is appropriate for ages 5-7.

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